Going to UCLA for Surgery

Oct 23rd, 2012 | By | Category: Your Turn

from UCLA website

October 23, 2012 ~ Linda K., a patient advocate and blogger writes about what you need to know in advance of seeking mesh removal surgery from UCLA.

Insurance- some companies may require tests be done in advance of surgery. This not only drives up the cost of medicine and it could require that you make three visits to UCLA. Linda suggests raise this problem with your insurance company.

Remember what Lisa did?  She held a protest outside of her Northern California healthcare provider’s hospital and was almost immediately offered a referral outside of the system. See her story here.
Linda swears by marshmallow root to keep her urinary tract infection at bay, either tea or a capsule she gets from a health food store since she has a problem taking antibiotics.  See her post on the herb here:
http://teapapers.com/bladdersling/2012/05/bladder-slings-uti-infections

She goes on to explain the urodynamics test which determines how well your bladder empties. You can watch how well your bladder empties on a screen she says here:
http://urology.ucla.edu/body.cfm?id=478&ref=12&action=detail

Ultimately it’s the translabial ultrasound, offered at UCLA that will show mesh. Linda has more about that on her blog.

Thank you Linda!!

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
Tags: , ,

Leave a Comment

We hope you find this a helpful resource. National News Editor, Jane Akre, began MDND with the hope of providing the latest news, information and perspective from the regulatory, industry and patient point of view, something that goes under-reported in much of the coverage of medical devices. The public is just now becoming aware that many devices do not undergo the same scrutiny as prescription drugs and are instead grandfathered in under an FDA loophole that has gone largely unchanged since the 1970s. As a result, patients become the post-market clinical trial subjects, and many suffer devastating and permanent injuries.